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History of Gambling in Ancient Greece

People love gambling – it gives them excitement and a chance to test their luck. It’s not hard to believe these games have been around forever. Ancient Greece is the first place we discover traces of gambling games on European land, dating back to the 7th century B.C.

Fascinating History of the Games Played in Ancient Greece

Ancient literature shows records of Greeks playing dice and other luck-based games. They also used to bet on animal fights (dogs, chickens, and other birds).

Let’s find more about the kind of games people in ancient greece used to play! 

Heads and Tails

One of the most famous games of that time is Heads and Tails. Before the introduction of coins, the game was played with shells, and people would bet on the outcome of whichever side came upwards.

Chequers

Although they called it ‘Tilia’ back then, ancient Greeks also played chequers. The game was also known as ‘The Game of 12 lines’ in ancient Rome. 

Pitch and Toss

Another popular game in the era was Pitch and Toss. The players would throw coins to a wall and see whose coin landed the farthest. The winner used to collect all the coins from the loser.

Dice games

Dice games were also widely popular in that time period. Ancient Greeks used objects like animal bones and clay dice. Not unlike modern-day dice games, rolling the same numbers in a single throw was considered a win. They called it ‘the throw of Aphrodite.’

Par Impar Ludere

Perhaps the easiest yet trickiest game was Par Impar Ludere. One person would hold a handful of small objects while the other guessed whether the number was odd or even.

Gambling in Greek Gods

Playing a game with such high risks, people often invoke their Gods or Lucks for help. Ancient Greeks weren’t much different. Prior to participating in a match, Greeks called Hermes, the God of gambling, hazard, earning, and gaming. Being extremely religious, they considered a single throw of dice to be ‘in God’s lap.’ Interestingly, people still call upon Hermes before a game.

Gambling in ancient Greece was also entertainment for the Gods. There is evidence that the Greek Gods gambled themselves. Key figures from Greek mythology, Hermes and Pan, are renowned for participating in gambling. There are myths about Gods Hades, Poseidon, and Zeus playing a game of straws to split the Universe amongst themselves.

In a renowned vase painted by Ezekias, Greek heroes Ajax and Achilles can be seen playing a game of dice during the Trojan War.

The Morality of Gambling Amongst Greeks

There was a split opinion on gambling in the early Greeks. Scholars and philosophers were highly opposed to the idea. Some went to the extent of calling it a plague, corrupting society. 

When it became out of control, the Government had to step in to take measures to discourage the act. The Greeks also had designated places to gamble. However, these places were mainly hidden as they were deemed shameful.

On the other hand, gambling is rampant in Greek literature, artwork, and historical pieces. The famous Greek poet, Homer, is known for supporting gambling. The practice can be seen as the theme in many of his works. Many sources tell that ancient Greeks settled disputes by way of gambling. It was also considered leisure and a common pastime among people.

Modern-day Gambling in Greece

Fast forward to today, gambling is legal in Greece, and casinos can be found close to big cities and popular resorts. Like other casinos around the world, Greek casinos offer gambling with luxurious accommodations and sports facilities. Modern-day casinos are much more refined, where players can bet in comfort and have a good time.

The Greek’s oldest casino, built in 1928, is located at Loutraki, a beach town on the Gulf of Corinth. Greece’s most famous casino, Mont Parnes Regency Casino of Athens, is known for its stylish ways of modern-day gambling and was built in the 1960s.

Though permitted, gambling in Greece is strictly under state control. Online gambling has also been approved since 2012.

Final Word

Whether good or bad, gambling is integral to today’s society. Though people have mixed views on the act, the link between gambling’s origin and ancient Greek civilization can’t be denied.

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6 Best Games About Ancient Rome

If a period or setting in history has the most potential to be turned into video games, it’s ancient Rome. Due to the extensive historical documents describing the fantastic people, locations, and traditions of a civilization that lasted over 1,500 years, Rome is one of the most fascinating ancient societies.

The fall of Rome was one of Europe’s most tumultuous periods, and since Roman civilization influenced so many countries, it has captivated people’s interest for ages. There are numerous Rome-inspired books, movies, games, and even fashion!

For now, let’s focus on the best games about Ancient Rome. This best demonstrates how playing and learning may be combined in minutes.

1. Rome: Total War

Game Release Year: 2004

Historical Period: 270 BC to 14 AD

Image by Wikipedia

With its outstanding campaign and addicting core gameplay, Rome: Total War is a real treat for any enthusiast of the Roman era. Most people didn’t think it was feasible to combine real-time strategy and turn-based gameplay, but Creative Assembly did it. Rome: Total War was the first of several games that combined many characters on the screen, allowing players to combat the army against a single console.

The game depicts the peak and last centuries of the Republican period and the initial years of Ancient Rome’s imperial era. At first, the user assumes charge of one of three Roman dynasties, with other non-Roman clans becoming available later.

It gives a thorough understanding of the Roman army’s structure and how the Romans controlled the inhabitants of towns and cities. It also requires the player to think clearly and sensibly to become the Roman Empire’s Ruler. This is what makes it one of the best games about Ancient Rome.

2. Ryse: Son of Rome

Game Release Year: 2013

Historical Period: 54-68 AD

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Ryse: Son of Rome is based in Ancient Rome during Nero’s reign, a fascinating period in the empire’s history. While the majority of the game takes place far outside Rome, in Britannia, on the outskirts of the empire, we get a fair look at numerous historical facts and personalities along the way.

The personalities are not a hundred percent historically correct but are inspired by actual events. These include Nero: Rome’s emperor, warrior queen Boudica, Commodus and Basillius: children of Nero and Damocles amongst many others! With a surprisingly sophisticated combat system, players will engage in large-scale conflicts and gladiatorial clashes in the field.

3. Age of Decadence

Game Release Year: 2015

Historical Period: 395 AD Fall of the Roman Empire

Image by Youtube

The game is set in a world based on the collapse of the Roman Empire. Age of Decadence has a sophisticated turn-based combat system and a rich conversation and decision system that has a significant impact on how the world evolves around them.

As they engage in Roman politics and betrayals, gamers get to build their own identity. It’s also one of the few games that give you complete control over your character. You’ll be in Rome. As a politician, your job will be to keep Rome from breaking apart by avoiding hostile attacks. In essence, gamers must aid in the recovery of this civilization. However, because the narrative is set during the fall of the Roman Empire, there is no happy ending.

4. Shadow of Rome

Game Release Year: 2005

Historical Period: 48 BC

Image by Youtube

The storyline is a dramatized account of Julius Caesar’s assassination, centering on two main characters that the player will assume the role of. The first is Agrippa, a warrior whose father is suspected of murdering Caesar and is condemned to combat in gladiatorial theaters. The second is Octavianus, who embarks to prove Agrippa’s father’s righteousness.

In summary, it’s a wonderful chance to witness and participate in the Roman lifestyle. Players appreciate this old Roman game, which they see as both inventive and beautiful.

5. Assassin’s Creed: Origins

Game Release Year: 2017

Historical Period: 49-43 BC

Image by Forbes

The player assumes Bayek, a Medjay, and Aya, his wife, as they fight to defend the people of the Ptolemaic Empire during a period of massive uprisings. The Pharaoh, Ptolemy XIII, battles to preserve his authority while harboring desires to extend his kingdom.

Even though the game is centered in Ancient Egypt during the Ptolemaic period, gamers will still engage with historical personalities such as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Pompey Magnus, Brutus, Lucius Septimus, and others from Rome’s past.

Image by Youtube

6. Grand Ages: Rome

Game Release Year: 2009

Historical Period: 60-53 BC

Image by Youtube

Grand Ages: Rome is an empire-building and real-time strategy game set during the last period of the Roman Republic. The game depicts actual past events, such as the slave rebellion headed by Spartacus, a former gladiator, and allows players to choose between Julius Caesar and Pompey Magnus.

Players are entrusted with accomplishing missions and establishing a reputation as leaders and politicians. Players must keep the population happy by providing adequate food, religion, and amusement. When players struggle to meet the requirements of their people, crime and sickness may develop, and houses may be abandoned.

The list of best games about Ancient Rome does not end here. It is to get you started. These games not only allow you to get a taste of the Roman culture through characters and settings but also puts you in their shoes. This is because history is not only about learning what happened in the past. You also need to contemplate what could have happened and the possible consequences of those events. This is what these games allow you to do!

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History History Adventures Learning Materials

Beauty Hacks Used by Women in Ancient Egypt

Makeup may appear to be a modern phenomenon but contrary to popular belief, cosmetics were also considered essential in ancient days. You may have heard Cleopatra’s – the great Egyptian Queen’s name in discussions related to makeup!

Ancient Egyptians were highly self-conscious about their appearance. In fact, they were so meticulous that they insisted on being well-dressed even after death. The different items discovered during explorations have unveiled these nuances of ancient Egyptian beauty practices.

In this blog post, we will discuss ancient Egypt’s beauty secrets and their importance in the respective era. 

Why was makeup important in ancient Egypt?

It is no secret that ancient Egyptians were beauty-obsessed individuals. You will never see a picture of that time without the person laden with heavy makeup.  Both men and women cared about how they looked and engaged in various rituals and practices to boost it. 

One of the most interesting facts about ancient Egyptian makeup is how Egyptians at that time used makeup for more than just accentuating their beauty. Irrespective of gender, everyone used to use several cosmetics on their face and massage them all over it to safeguard it from the harsh weather and the heat.

Lastly, they also felt hygiene was vital to the body and that taking care of one’s physique was a symbol of dignity.

Beauty Secrets of Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egyptians had particular routines and products that helped them maintain their beauty and protect their skin! 

Makeup

Men and women used kohl to enhance their inherent attractiveness. Even now women feel using kohl or eyeliners results in big, beautiful eyes just like how you might have seen in Ancient Egyptian historical art. Aside from beauty, the broad kohl line over the eyes shielded the eyes from the desert sun’s harsh glare and had antibacterial effects.

The History of Eyeliner
Image from Vice

Lipsticks were created by combining vegetable oil with ochre and, in some instances, squashed beetles. The result was a beautiful color that made them feel pretty and protected their lips from getting parched and dry. 

However, ancient Egyptian beauty secrets like these caused more harm than benefit. It is said that these products were highly poisonous and posed risks of diseases and even death.

Exfoliation and Hydration

Ancient Egyptians did not put on makeup directly on their face. Instead, they would first exfoliate using Dead Sea salts. This would eliminate contaminants and provide a smoother base for any product application. 

To further hydrate their skin, they took long milk baths and used coffee scrubs. Coffee scrub for the skin relieves inflammation, enhances blood flow, eliminates dead skin cells, reduces puffiness, enhances skin tone and texture, and gives the skin a youthful glow.

Image from Pinterest

They also applied body oils made from almonds, castor oil and even flowers to protect and shield themselves from the harsh climate.

Waxing

Beauty for Ancient Egyptians wasn’t only about makeup. Because they prioritized hygiene and self-care, they considered hair unclean and uncivilized. Women waxed using a sugar, lemon, and water combination to eliminate hair and maintain smooth skin. This hack has been reinvented as ‘sugaring’ in modern times and is considered quite popular.

Masks

Honey and milk are considered essential components for any home made mask today. This stems from ancient Egyptian beauty secrets. Milk has lactic acid that hydrates and exfoliates the skin. Egyptians combined milk and honey to make face masks that kept their skin healthy and shiny.

How To Make A Honey Face Mask: 4 Recipes For Glowing Skin | mindbodygreen
Image from Mind Body Green

Eye bags

Egyptians used avocado slices to reduce puffiness beneath their eyes. This nutrient-dense fruit can help with more than just swollen eyes. 

It also aids in:

  • the removal of dark circles and eye bags
  • the reduction of wrinkles, and
  • the reduction of fine lines.
Cute Avocado Images | Free Vectors, Stock Photos & PSD
Image from Free Pik

Nails and Eyebrows

Egyptians used henna, a coloring agent, to color their nails yellowish-orange. This is more common in asian culture today but is astonishing where the idea originated from.  In addition to leaving a dye behind, it promotes growth and is a natural conditioner. Because it provides a cooling effect after application, it was often utilized as a cooling agent in hot weather.

Image from Pinterest

Ancient Egyptians preferred black and prominent brows which is now back in fashion. Previously they filled their eyebrows with burned almonds using the charred nuts as vitamin E-filled eyebrow liners. 

Diet

Egyptians’ eating choices also reflected their fascination with beauty. They devoured dates in massive quantities as they have antioxidants, protein, and fiber. They are a fantastic energy source and provide various health advantages.

Image from Pinterest

Final Word

Ancient Egyptians exhibited their expertise and interest in maintaining their body. They understood and practiced the concept of healthy body care, leaving behind many beauty hacks still used today. 

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7 Most Shocking Political Assassinations Since 1900

Since the creation of community social frameworks, shocking political assassinations in modern history have been a component of social reality. Some were shot, some were stabbed, and some were bombed. 

Political assassinations are mostly less about the person himself and more about his political position and ideologies. In addition to causing public outrage, grief, and pain – political assassinations tend to bring a billion conspiracy theories and reasons for why they happened. 

Here are some of the major political assassinations in history! 

Archduke Franz Ferdinand, 1914

Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria - Wikipedia
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Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the successor to the Austro-Hungarian Dynasty, was killed at Sarajevo in June 1914 by a Serbian called Gavilo Princip. Princip was a supporter of the nationalist movement Young Bosnia, which intended to liberate Bosnia from the chains of foreign control. He was angered by the Austro-Hungarian invasion of Bosnia. The assassination is largely seen as the trigger for the commencement of World War One in August 1914

Mahatma Gandhi, 1948

Mahatma Gandhi | Biography, Education, Religion, Accomplishments, Death, &  Facts | Britannica
Image by Britannica

Gandhi was assassinated in Delhi on January 30, 1948, by Hindu extremist Nathuram Godse. He was a few minutes late for the gathering since he was strolling from Birla House to the field where his evening prayer services were conducted. 

How a global symbol of non-violence was killed en route to praying made this one of the most tragic and shocking political assassinations.  The killing shook the whole globe, and thousands of Indians flocked to the roads to pay their respects to the nation’s father.

John F Kennedy, 1963

John F. Kennedy - Quotes, Wife & Assassination - Biography
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Former Marine Lee Harvey Oswald shot and killed the 35th US President John F. Kennedy in a motorcade in Dallas on November 22, 1963. Kennedy is recognized as one of the finest and most beloved presidents in American history, despite lasting less than three years in office. 

Lee Harvey Oswald, his shooter, was arrested but murdered before he could be prosecuted. Oswald was shot and killed by a nightclub owner just two days after the tragedy. Many have seen this as evidence of a larger cover-up and a conspiracy.

Martin Luther King Jr., 1968

Martin Luther King Jr.
Image by New York Times

James Earl Ray fatally murdered the renowned American political activist Martin Luther King Jr. on a hotel balcony in Memphis on April 4, 1968. James Earl Ray, his assailant, first admitted guilt to murder but then retracted his statement. Many people, including King’s family, feel that his killing was orchestrated by the government and/or the mafia to quiet him.

The assassination prompted a phase of nationwide grief, which aided in the passing of an equitable housing measure, the civil rights era’s final significant legislative success.

Indhira Gandhi, 1984

Indira Gandhi
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Indira Gandhi, the country’s third Prime Minister and the country’s sole female leader, was another casualty of religious conflicts in India. Gandhi was a controversial character who backed the independence cause in East Pakistan, resulting in the creation of Bangladesh. 

Her Sikh bodyguards killed her in 1984 after commanding military action at the Golden Temple in Amritsar, one of the most sacred sites for Sikhs.  Gandhi’s killing sparked a wave of aggression against the Sikh community throughout India, with alleged 8,000 deaths as a result.

Yitzhak Rabin, 1995

Yitzhak Rabin
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Yitzhak Rabin was Israel’s fifth Prime Minister, elected in 1974 and 1992 on a campaign that supported the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Negotiations.

The Oslo Accords, intended to settle Israeli-Palestinian disputes, were signed by the Israeli Prime Minister. On November 4, 1995, a right-wing militant named Yigal Amir became enraged and killed the Prime Minister. There has been no agreement between the two countries since his death. Many people see his killing as the end of the sort of peace he envisioned and strove for, making it one o the major political assassinations.

Benazir Bhutto, 2007

Benazir Bhutto, first female Prime Minister of Pakistan
Image by Britannica

Benazir Bhutto was Pakistan’s first female Prime Minister and the first woman to lead a democratic administration in a Muslim majority country. She was also one of the nation’s most powerful political personalities. Her death, caused by a suicide bomber during a political gathering in 2007, shocked the entire world. However, her killing boosted public backing for her party, the Pakistan Peoples’ Party, which gained majority seats in the two-month-old elections.

Final Word

Not only did these assassinations play a significant role in the creation and fall of some of history’s most powerful civilizations, but they also continue today as a way to defend one party’s honor over another. What has to be noted is the impact it has for years to come!

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10 Fascinating Facts about the Byzantine Empire

Originating in 330 A.D., the Byzantine Empire was a huge and strong civilization. The empire was established 1000 years ago on the Eastern side of the Great Roman Empire and thrived to become the most dominant and prosperous until Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II conquered it in 1453 A.D.

The Byzantine Empire was a center of education and was renowned for its writing, folk art, and architecture. With all the significance of the Byzantine empire, there are a lot of topics one can talk about.

Byzantine art, an introduction – Smarthistory
Image from Smart History

In this blog post, we will discuss some fascinating facts about the Byzantine Empire.

1. Byzantine Empire was not always called Byzantine

Byzantines referred to themselves as “Romans.” It took a long time after the fall of the Empire for the phrase “Byzantine Empire” to be coined. 

Byzantine Empire is the name used by contemporary historians to separate the state from the western region of the Roman Empire. The name is a reference to Constantinople, the capital city of the Byzantine Empire, which was established in Byzantium.

2. The Byzantines had a bizarre way of fighting political battles

Instead of holding elections, presidential candidates went to great lengths to see who could physically inflict the greatest pain on their opponents to prevent them from coming their way.

They would settle political rivalries by blinding, amputating, or any other form of mutilation that would render the person futile for leadership. Some even opted for castration as it was believed to be the greatest punishment and would deprive the person of a potential heir.

Political mutilation in Byzantine culture - Wikipedia
Image from Wikipedia

3. Chariot Racing was huge back in the day

The popularity of chariot racing is among the many interesting facts about Byzantine Empire. The risk of fatality was quite great as the chariot Racers ran the risk of being pulled behind their horses and killed.

How much of a popular force was chariot racing in the Byzantine Empire? -  Quora
Image from Quora

The thrills, carnage, and potential gambling winnings appear to draw people to racing. Most of these charioteers were slaves, but winning a race might win them as much as 15 bags of gold.

4. Adulterers and those with the knowledge of adultery were punished

Emperor Leo III implemented rules governing close relationships as part of the legal system changes he oversaw. During Leo’s rule, a married man who engaged in adultery received 12 lashes as punishment in addition to a fine. An unmarried man found fornicating would get six lashes.

According to some sources, those involved in adultery would have their noses cut off, while those who knew the sin would be flogged.

Pin by مسافر مسافر on painting | Byzantine empire, Eastern roman, Medieval  world
Image from Pinterest

5. The Byzantines were the first to use the Greek Fire

The origin of Greek fire in 672 AD is one of the most fascinating facts about the Byzantine Empire. Large siphons set on the prows of the Byzantine ships were used to pump the substance onto opposing ships and men. It would ignite once it came in contact with seawater, and extinguishing it required tremendous effort. 

Throughout the seventh, eighth, and tenth centuries, Byzantium was repeatedly protected by this substance against Arab and Russian invasions.

Greek fire - Wikipedia
Image from Wikipedia

6. Constantinople’s fall due to cannons

One piece of military hardware, known as the cannon, bears a significant portion of the blame for how Constantinople itself fell after a 53-day siege in 1453 AD. 

The gun launched cannonballs that weighed around half a ton. It destroyed defenses that had been in place for thousands of years. A single weapon has destroyed the formidable fortifications of the formerly impregnable city.

Image from Pinterest

7. The rise of the Orthodox Church

The Greek-speaking church in Byzantium acquired significant liturgical variations from the Catholic, Latin-speaking church in the West throughout the ages, even though it was virtually always a Christian nation. The Eastern Orthodox Church in the Byzantine East and the Roman Catholic Church in the West are two distinct streams of Christianity that resulted from this “Great Schism.”

8. The Byzantines were the first to try rosemary

The Byzantines were the first people to cook using saffron and rosemary to flavor roasted lamb. These aromatics, which were well-known in antiquity, had not previously been considered to be culinary components.

The Byzantines were also the first to enjoy eggplant, lemons, and oranges, which were mainly unfamiliar to ancient Europeans.

rosemary | Description, Plant, Spice, Uses, History, & Facts | Britannica
Image from Britannica

9. Most of the ancient literature was saved by the Byzantine Empire 

Byzantine intellectuals who upheld the old traditions of literature and learning rescued the majority of the philosophical writings of thinkers like Aristotle and Plato and the historical manuscripts of Greece and Rome. The Byzantines brought back works lost in the West for many years.

A Global Middle Ages through the Pages of Decorated Books (article) | Khan  Academy
Image from Khan Academy

10. The Byzantines expanded our range of jams

The Greeks and Romans have known jams since ancient times. Still, additional jellies based on pears, citrons, and lemons throughout the Byzantine Empire also appeared. The expanding sugar supply aided the confectioner’s innovation.

Conclusion

Byzantine Empire - Kids | Britannica Kids | Homework Help
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The Byzantine Empire produced a rich tradition of art and learning and acted as a military barrier between the states. We mentioned some of the fascinating facts about the Byzantine Empire that people might still not be aware of, although it lasted for more than a thousand years.

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American Celebrities Who Served in World War 2

We have all seen hundreds of movies related to war and active combat. Rather than honoring these films that represent the military or conflict, we’re honoring the cinema stars who have served their nation in the real world.

World War Two gripped the masses like no other conflict before or after. Artists were employed by several countries, particularly the United States, to gain support for the war. Some stars even left the safety of Hollywood to fight on the field.

Here are a few examples of some of the most famous American celebrities who served in World War 2!

Jimmy Stewart

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Jimmy Stewart was the first member of Hollywood to join the war operation. His father had taken part in World War I, and it is assumed that perhaps it was because of his family’s long military heritage that he decided to accept the risk.

James Stewart, who enlisted in the US Air Force in 1941, first took part in recruitment operations that included radio engagements and propaganda videos. Eventually, he piloted and directed several bombing flights over Nazi-occupied Germany and Europe. Stewart stayed in the Air Force Reserve after the war, eventually attaining the position of brigadier general.

Audrey Hepburn

How to master Audrey Hepburn's classic cat-eye flick | Vogue India
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Audrey Hepburn spent the war years in occupied Holland, where her uncle was killed for resisting the Nazi takeover, and her half-brother was transported to a German labor camp. She aided the Dutch Resistance by doing covert live shows to generate funds and transporting information and goods.

Paul Newman

Paul Newman | Biography, Movies, Assessment, & Facts | Britannica
Image by Britannica

After graduating from high school in 1943, Paul Newman got enlisted in the US Navy and worked on aircraft carriers in the Pacific theatre as a radio operator and turret gunner. Newman was assigned to Barbers Point, Hawaii, in 1944 to serve as a substitute pilot for torpedo bomber units.

Newman received the following medals after being honorably discharged in 1946:

  • American Area Campaign medal
  • The Good Conduct Medal, and
  • World War II Victory medal.

Alec Guinness

17 Top Alec Guinness ideas | guinness, movie stars, actors & actresses
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In 1939, the acclaimed British actor joined the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve, putting his successful stage career on hold. In July 1943, he was a key figure in the Allied invasion of Sicily. Guinness spearheaded a landing craft carrying almost 200 British soldiers into the shores of Sicily. Subsequently, he transported guns and ammunition to Yugoslav fighters in the eastern Mediterranean.

Kirk Douglas

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Kirk Douglas was born Issur Danielovitch and brought up as Izzy Demsky. He changed his name to Kirk Douglas immediately before enlisting in the US Navy in 1941.

Kirk Douglas was first rejected from the US Air Force after failing his psychiatric exam. Douglas did not get disheartened by the setback and immediately volunteered in the US Navy. He was admitted despite his impaired vision.

In 1944, he was medically discharged owing to battle injuries as a communications officer in anti-submarine combat.

Clark Gable

Clark Gable filmography - Wikipedia
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Clark Gable enrolled in the US Army Air Forces after the loss of his wife, Carole Lombard, the first American female battle victim of Wartime. Gable was posted in England and completed five combat missions as an observer-gunner despite joining at the age of 43 after starring in a recruiting film.

Gable returned to America at the end of 1943 to finish his picture, Combat America. Due to his age, he was upgraded to major the next year and was finally discharged from active service on June 12, 1944.

Adolf Hitler was said to be a major Clark Gable admirer who had promised a large prize to anybody who could capture the star alive and bring him back to Germany.

Morgan Freeman

Morgan Freeman on screen and stage - Wikipedia
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Even though his service was not prominent, Morgan made it to the list as he is one of the most renowned celebrities. Morgan Freeman turned down a Jackson State University acting scholarship because he wanted to be a pilot. He enlisted in the Air Force in 1955, but after an experience of battle in training, he concluded that this was not the field for him. He then went into the less risky field of filmmaking. 

Elvis Presley

Elvis Presley | Biography, Songs, Movies, Death, & Facts | Britannica
Image by Britannica

The American singer Elvis Presley joined the United States Army for two years in 1958. He was largely recognized as a popular single in the entertainment industry at the time of his enrollment.

Presley’s music had aroused national fury before he joined the army. Many parents, religious leaders, and educators cheered his enlistment in the military. His management convinced Presley to serve as a regular soldier despite being allowed to enroll in Special Services and reside in priority accommodation. This gained him the admiration of many of his colleagues and Americans who had previously held a wrong opinion of him.

Hank Greenburg

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Many baseball players suspended their careers in the mid-40s to serve. Greenberg was recruited for WWII service in May 1941 when he was in his prime. After three months in the army, he came to Detroit to train for the 1942 game. When the assault on Pearl Harbor occurred, Hank Greenberg abruptly reversed his decision and proclaimed publicly that he was re-enlisting in the army. 

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6 Best Games about Alternate History: Learning History the Interesting Way

If you thought video games about history were the ultimate learning tool you needed, you are mistaken. While historic games give you facts and figures about significant past events, games about alternate history allow you to dissect events unlike anything else.

While learning history, often questions are asked about what could have occurred if a single event in history had been altered — a life spared, or possibly a life lost. Thinking about different angles and endings helps gain clarity and understanding about the cause of those events.

You can achieve this in the easiest, funniest way by playing some of the best games about alternate history. These games are incredibly imaginative and thrilling stories that combine genuine historical locations and events with fantasy. Here are some examples that you can try out!

1. Freedom Fighters

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After World War II, the US entered the Cold War. The Russian Empire started making its own nuclear arms and financing communist regime reforms worldwide. Although the superpowers never went to war, Freedom Fighters envisions a narrative where the Soviet Union invades New York.

In freedom fighters, you get to take on the role of Chris Stone, who is a plumber-turned-action hero. Together with his brother Troy, he is tasked with gathering rebels and ending the Soviet takeover of New York City.

2. Fallout

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In Fallout, China blasted the United States into a radioactive wasteland.  The fact that the 1950s never ended, yet technology evolved, is an intriguing aspect of the game. So, in addition to commercials, music, and fashion from the 1950s, there are robotics and plasma weapons. This difference generates the game’s comic tone amid immense terror, including it in one of the best games about alternate history.

The fallout shows odd equipment that runs on nuclear power because the transistor was never created after World War 2. Fallout uses a reality-based basis and twists it. There might be disastrous variations in how contemporary times played out if something as simple as the transistor was not created — a gadget that many individuals never think about.

3. Homefront

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The game’s narrative takes place in the 2010s when North Korea and superpowers clash over the country’s military aggressiveness, which includes a successful nuclear test and the loss of a South Korean ship.

The United States is shown in Homefront in a completely different light than it is presently, with a defense far from the most competitive in the world. As a result, it’s a prime target for a North Korean attack, and it’s up to you to incite a revolt that will liberate the country.

4. Bioshock

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The alternate history of Bioshock is tough to determine since it exists in several different timelines. Essentially, it occurs in a world when technology progresses at a far quicker rate. This is why, in what seems to be the 1950s, there is essentially futuristic technology.

BioShock transports you to the wreckage of a failed Objectivist civilization. Rapture’s clientele has become substance maniacs addicted to ADAM, a DNA-modifying chemical. You play as Jack, who explores further inside Rapture to learn its mysteries and stop Andrew Ryan, the organization’s commander.

Because cities like Rapture are so remote and cut off from the rest of the world, there isn’t much historical data to draw on. However, it demonstrates a great deal in terms of American customs and beliefs in various situations.

5. Prey

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Prey alters history by failing the assassination attempt on President Kennedy, who would live until 2031. This leads to a period of scientific advancement that would result in far more space travel and research. The game goes on to show how you’ll be fleeing from strange aliens that appear to be on the verge of taking over the Earth.

The chronology in the game features humanity’s discovery of the Typhon, aggressive aliens with both physical and mental characteristics. The Typhon was discreetly kidnapped and held in the Kletka space shuttle by the USA and the USSR.

6. We Happy Few

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This alternate timeline depicts a World War 2 ending in which Hitler loses power and Germany becomes the German Empire. They then attacked England, which quickly submitted and survived the invasion. Considering how drastically different World War II would have turned out if Germany had control of Great Britain, We Happy Few is dangerously close to reality.

In this game, people living in the Wellington wells had to do something horrible with kids, so they invented a medication to help them recall. This, on the other hand, soon goes downhill. They are joyful because of the drug, but they have no morality. They experience visions and hit anyone who declines to take the pills.

Final Word

Players interested in history may enjoy the mentioned best games about alternate history that explore “what-if?” scenarios. These games follow and modify real history to produce new realities. But because they are based on the authentic culture and technology of the period, you get to learn a lot!

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History History Adventures Learning Materials

9 Significant Historical Moments that Shaped Our Modern World

There are countless examples of important historical moments that changed the world we live in today. Some occurrences inspired movements that transformed the world and wars that gave birth to new nations.

Choosing the most significant event in history is a subjective task by default. These instances are too numerous to list and difficult to compare throughout history. 

We picked the events with the most significant far-reaching influence, even if it wasn’t necessarily the most renowned event in a particular year.

Industrial Revolution 1760

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In the 18th century, new industrial advances enabled civilizations to concentrate, specialize, and flourish, resulting in the first Industrial Revolution. The first American factory was founded in 1790 by Samuel Slater. 

The creation of machine-driven industries sparked a wave of urbanization, increasing global trade, social unrest, new sources of income, and new forms of authority. It changed the way people thought about labor and professions and social welfare and what it meant to make a livelihood.

The outbreak of World War I, 1914

On the 28th of June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, were assassinated in Sarajevo by Gavrilo Princip. Following the First World War, there was a greater appreciation for women’s contributions to society. Several countries granted women the right to vote.

There was also a larger recognition of the role of the working class, which had battled in the war and now wished for a more peaceful future.

Russian Revolution 1917

Image from the Guardian

The Bolshevik revolution, headed by Lenin, brought in a radically different type of government with global ramifications in October 1917. The Soviet Union changed the Russian people’s lives by bringing economic progress. However, this came at the cost of political oppression. The Soviet Union’s ideology also resulted in a long-running Cold War, an ideological division between western democracy and Soviet Communism.

Stock Market Crash 1929

Image from Investopedia

Following the stock market surge of the 1920s, Wall Street stock prices plummeted in October 1929. This resulted in a long-term drop in share price, which triggered the worldwide Great Depression. Unemployment in the United States has risen to 25%, while global output and commerce have also decreased. The poverty and a sense of isolation that followed fueled the rise of political extremes throughout the world.

World War II 1939

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Hitler took control of Poland on September 1, 1939, while France and Britain attacked Germany two days later, starting World War II. The destruction was practically unmeasurable: casualties were estimated to be between 70 and 85 million. 

The end of World War II signaled the start of a new era for the global market. International trade began to increase again under the rule of a rising superpower, the United States of America and was supported by technology from the Second Industrial Revolution.

Foundation of United Nations 1945


Image from New York Times

The United Nations was founded on October 24, 1945. Its mission was to avert conflict and organize philanthropic operations to alleviate poverty, enforce civil treaties, and safeguard the environment. Despite its inability to stop hostility on several occasions, the establishment is considered a historical moment in history. The United Nations remains an essential international platform, with the United Nations Charter guaranteeing fundamental rights and liberties without difference or bias.

Hiroshima Attack 1945

Image from Britannica

Hiroshima and Nagasaki’s atomic bombing by the US in 1945 was one of the major historical events that changed the world. The Japanese surrendered due to the destruction, putting a stop to a long and costly Pacific conflict. Japan’s capitulation was once considered impossible. The atomic bomb, on the other hand, expedited Japan’s defeat.

The atomic bomb had far-reaching consequences that went beyond the conclusion of WWII. It demonstrated the destruction that a third global war could bring to the rest of the world. Even today, Hiroshima’s impact and the prospect of nuclear war loom large worldwide.

9/11 Terrorist Attacks 2001

In November 2001, 19 terrorists killed over 3,000 people in the greatest attack on American territory since the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor in 1941. The incident significantly impacted American foreign policy and was a driving force behind the contentious Iraq invasion.

Covid Pandemic 2019

Covid-19 pandemic

Covid-19, a new virus, was discovered in China in late 2019 and, to date, remains the most significant event in human history. People were restricted to their residences, and offices were shut down due to substantial worldwide ‘lockdowns.’ 

Despite travel limitations, the virus spread to every country across the globe. The lockdown severely harmed the world economy, which resulted in a high increase in unemployment and a drop in the production of goods and services. 

You must check out Global Pandemic: Plague of Athens to help make sense of global pandemics!

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History Learning Materials

7 Best History Podcasts for History Enthusiasts

There are hundreds of podcasts devoted to every aspect of history – the French Revolution, Ancient Rome, World War 2, you name it! It’s easy to become overwhelmed by the number of alternatives available if you’re a history fan searching for a new podcast to listen to.

Whether you are a history buff or someone who wants to broaden their horizon, here is a list of some of the best history podcasts you can listen to.

1. Slow Burn

Slow Burn (TV Series 2020– ) - IMDb

Addressing topics ranging from Watergate to the LA Uprisings and the Iraq War, each season of ‘Slow Burn’ takes a detailed and insightful look at events you’ve undoubtedly heard about. This audio podcast from Slate magazine is perfect if you’re searching for some very in-depth explanations of significant periods in recent American history.

2. Lore

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Lore is one of the cool history podcasts that delve into the world of dark and historical real crime. In this modern ghostly experience, host Aaron Mahnke investigates horrific events, unusual animals, and peculiar tales from the old days. This is not a podcast for the weak-hearted since reality is more terrifying than fiction. People who enjoy riddles, conspiracy theories and sci-fi/fantasy will particularly like this show.

3. The History Chicks

The History Chicks The History Chicks - Any resemblance to a boring history  class is purely coincidental!

History chicks is another one of the most entertaining history podcasts that feminist history fanatics genuinely enjoy. It is a show produced by two ‘history chicks’ who analyze the most famous historical female figures. 

It is guaranteed to pique your interest in the thousands of years of female history. It discusses the struggles, setbacks, and intriguing information about personalities like Charlotte Bront and Grace O’ Malley. Many segments also center on the beginnings of fairy tale characters like Cinderella and Red Riding Hood, in addition to historic personalities. Episodes on the webpage are presented in chronological sequence for easier viewing.

4. Hardcore History

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History: Addendum | Podcasts on Audible | Audible.com

Dan Carlin, a veteran reporter, uses a unique method in his podcast ‘Hardcore History,’ making it one of the best history podcasts. He is a master at using historical references to highlight current challenges. Carlin engages the audience by delivering theatrically throughout, questioning some of history’s most pivotal moments. 

He comes up with ingenious perspectives on historical occurrences. Was Alexander the Great, for example, a murderous madman like Hitler? Most programs are around five hours long, yet they keep people on edge by concentrating on famous figures, battles, and nuclear proliferation, among other topics.

5. Revolutions

Revolutions Podcast by Mike Duncan - S3: French Revolution - Episode 10 -  YouTube

Major societal shifts seldom occur without a bloodbath. The tumultuous events before the English Civil War, the French Revolution, and other prominent social revolutions are narrated by Mike Duncan. Duncan’s History of Rome podcast may be of interest to enthusiasts of Revolutions. You learn a great deal about a particular topic because each season is allocated to one movement. 

This film has no theatrics, sketches, special guests, soundtracks, or music. His analyses of the relevant histories aren’t very new or original, and they’re free of academic jargon as well. There’s nothing unusual here; he’s simply telling us what happened. This may be why it works so well, making it one of the best ancient history podcasts!

6. Art Curious

Podcast Episodes & Archives

Do you find art history to be boring? You might want to rethink your stance after this podcast. It’s strange, humorous, intriguing, captivating, and liberating simultaneously. Jennifer’s sincerity, expertise, and excitement show that these podcasts have been thoroughly researched, meticulously produced, and delivered. 

Art enthusiasts and casual listeners alike will appreciate learning about the lives of legendary painters like Van Gogh and Picasso. Jennifer stays away from focusing primarily on artists and paintings that have already garnered much attention. 

7. Burnt Toast

Burnt Toast | Podcasts on Audible | Audible.com

As the name suggests, this podcast is all about food. There isn’t a better option for history buffs that are also foodies. When you visit the website, you’ll see recipes based on the presumption that all of the conversations about food have made you hungry. ‘We are what we eat’ is a famous saying, and this podcast goes on to further explore how what we consume shapes our societies. 

Michael Harlan Turkell, the speaker, examines tense moments in global history through the perspective of culinary tradition and features culinary professionals for an enthralling insight as to why we eat what we eat.

Final Thoughts 

Given the scope, naturally, history podcast content is extensive, and there is a vast array available to choose from. To help you decide where to begin, we’ve gone through practically every history podcast available and picked just a few of the best history podcasts

We’ve broken them down into categories and interests and chosen the most entertaining history podcasts from them. Whether you love food, art, revolutions, or feminism – we have you covered.

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History History Adventures Learning Materials

Games Based on Important Historical Events: Learning the Smart Way

Video games based on important historical events take you back in time, ensuring that you fall in love with the subject! Historical video games allow players to become active participants in some of the most pivotal periods in human history. Unlike history textbooks, these games provide enormous experiences that cannot be matched by written content. Here are some of the video games based on important historical events that bring history to life!

1.      The Oregon Trail

Game Release Year: 1971

Historical Time Period: 1846–1869

The Oregon Trail is a famous computer game intended to teach youngsters about the hard realities of pioneer life on the Oregon Trail. In The Oregon Trail, players will assume a wagon commander attempting to cross the legendary Trail.

They’ll start in Independence, Missouri, and conclude in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. The game depicts how different classes could travel the Oregon Trail, with a banker having more money and hence more resources than a farmer. It was not uncommon for a group member to become ill and die, and this is no exception in the game.

The fear of wild Native Americans was exaggerated in the imaginations of actual travelers, and this was replicated in the computer game characters. Native Americans would emerge out of nowhere in the game to attack the travelers.

2.      Victoria II

Image from Amazon

Game Release Year: 2010

Historical Time Period: 1836–1936

The Industrial Revolution is more than just a transition from agriculture to industry. The Industrial Revolution sparked a boom in literacy and complex concepts like communism, labor laws, and universal suffrage. Victoria II allows gamers to experience the entire revolution.

Victoria II has a greater focus on internal control than on warfare. This is a massive geopolitical simulation in which you assume command of any state you choose at the start of the Victorian era in 1836 and govern it in real-time for the next century.

It will take the gamers on a virtual visit back in time where they will learn the historical events and take decisions that will help them visualize possible historical alternatives.

3.      Genghis Khan II

Game Release Year: 1992

Historical Time Period: 1184 AD – 1274 AD

Genghis Khan II is a turn-based grand strategy game featuring tactical and strategic phases. The strategy phase focuses on state-building, economic improvement, and diplomacy, while the tactics phase focuses on turn-based warfare between various forces.

There are four time periods covered in the game. Starting from the conquest of Mongolia, the transformation of Genghis Khan, the birth of the Yuan Dynasty to the conquest of the world. Aside from Genghis Khan, gamers can choose from various leaders from surrounding regions in North Africa, Asia, and even Europe.

4.      Battlefield Germany

Game Release Year: 1987

Historical Time Period: 1955–1991

Battlefield Germany is a strategic video game with turn-based gameplay. The game takes place in a hypothetical scenario in which powers of NATO and the Warsaw Pact engage a military conflict across Europe, focusing on West and East Germany.

Based on whatever party was selected, the gamer will enter the play on either side of Europe. When playing as NATO, the primary goal is to keep Soviet forces pinned down long enough for American assistance to come. When fighting as the Warsaw Pact, however, the goal is to eliminate all NATO troops. The game allows the player to view both sides of a significant historical event which is an integral part of any history lesson.

5.      1979 Revolution: Black Friday

Image from Oxford student

Game Release Year: 2016

Historical Time Period: 1978 (Iranian Revolution)

1979 Revolution: Black Friday allows gamers to see the upheavals through the eyes of a photographer who is witnessing the Iranian Revolution. Throughout the game, the player makes timed responses that determine the plot’s fate.

The game developers took hundreds of interviews with Iranians who experienced the revolution. Gamers may get history education through authentic pictures and audio recordings, in addition to picking their own journey in the game to find alternative narratives. By the end of the game, it feels like you experienced the Iranian revolution firsthand.

6.      Valiant Hearts: The Great War

Game Release Year: 2014

Historical Time Period: 1914 (World War I)

Valiant Hearts is a riveting and eye-opening story of the numerous hardships people endured during the Great War.  Valiant Hearts is, at its core, a puzzle game set against the backdrop of a gripping tale. In this game, four characters assist a German soldier in finding his true love.

Valiant Hearts is a unique game. It encompasses a magnificent experience that will warm your heart while also educating you about history. Collectibles from World War I are scattered throughout each level, and locating them reveals detailed descriptions of the object. Each level is organized by a useful chronology and events overview, and each page provides more historical knowledge, statistics, and critical events from WWI.

7.      The Saboteur

Image from change.org

Game Release Year: 2009

Historical Time Period: 1940 (World War II)

The player plays Sean Devlin the Saboteur, a street-tough Irish car racer stuck behind enemy territory in Nazi-occupied France in the 1940s. Sean battles through expansive Paris, slipping into the core of Nazi activities and disrupting their every move, driven by personal vengeance.

This game is unlike any other historical simulation of World War II. Instead of playing the game through the eyes of a soldier, you get to be a spy. Sean Devlin, the protagonist, is modeled on William Grover-Williams’ true story. While the Nazis took his life, his legacy helped lay the groundwork for France’s independence.

These games based on significant historical events aren’t experiences that will offer you a completely accurate representation of a historical period, but they will give you a sense of the era’s settings, culture, politics, military, and other aspects. These games have created a fantastic experience based on a solid historical foundation.

It’s just enough to give you a sense of critical historical events and lure you towards history. Once you develop a budding interest in the subject, you can explore the era or the personality that inspired you the most!